Emergency Medicine Residency

The Emergency Medicine Residency Program at Good Samaritan Hospital provides the best of the art and science of health and medicine across the continuum of life. We are committed to meeting the needs of our patients, while providing you a balance of professional and personal well-being. Our organized educational experience will shape you into a competent and compassionate expert in emergency medicine.

Comprehensive Training

We teach emergency medicine through experience in an emergency department under the supervision of board-certified and eligible emergency medicine physicians. You will also develop and cultivate clinical, academic, administrative and research skills, preparing you to become a leader and mentor in your field.

Considered one of New York’s finest emergency medicine facilities, Good Samaritan Hospital provides accessible and quality health care to the community. As one of the largest providers of emergency medical care on Long Island, we invest in the latest and most advanced technology.

We offer services in all major specialties supported by:

  • Adult and Pediatric Trauma Center — Verified Level II
  • Clinical Observation Unit
  • Clinician Performed Ultrasound System with PACS archival
  • Dedicated ED imaging services in a CT scanner and ultrasound suite
  • Dedicated Pediatric Emergency Department
  • Diagnostic evaluation — Labs and EKG
  • Epic electronic medical records
  • Emergency Cardiac Care Center/Catheterization Lab
  • Fast Track/Super Track treatment area
  • Imaging services with PACS archival
  • Real-time radiology reading reports
  • Sexual Assault Nurse Examiner (SANE) program
  • Stroke Center

As part of our commitment to the community, we encourage involvement with charities, local community centers, senior centers, schools and events. We have offered medical support and education to the Long Island Marathon, Diva Half Marathon, Senior Olympics, local elementary schools, gymnastic events, and more. We also have fundraising drives and participate in other charity fundraising events.

Fellowships

Our fellowships offer advanced training in:

  • Administration and Leadership
  • Emergency Ultrasound
  • Observation Medicine
  • Pediatric Emergency Medicine

Accreditation

The Emergency Medicine Residency Program at Good Samaritan Hospital is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME).

Program Leadership

 

David Levy, DO, FACEP, FACOEP
Emergency Medicine Program Director

Robert Gekle, MD
Emergency Medicine
Associate Program Director

Alison Kucera
Residency Coordinator

Contact the Department of Medical Education for additional information on the Emergency Medicine Residency Program at Good Samaritan Hospital.

Alison Kucera, Emergency Medicine Program Coordinator
Good Samaritan Hospital
Department of Medical Education
1000 Montauk Highway
West Islip, NY 11795
Phone: 631-376-4163
Fax: 631-376-3420
Alison.Kucera@chsli.org

Program Features

Good Samaritan Hospital offers our residents a competitive salary and benefits package. Some residency programs offer additional perks to help you as you learn.

Salaries

  • PGY 1 $69,275

  • PGY 2 $72,365

  • PGY 3 $75,455

  • PGY 3 Chief $77,955

  • PGY 4 $78,545

  • PGY 4 Chief $81,045

  • PGY 5 $80,605

  • PGY 6 $82,665

Benefits 

  • Health and dental insurance

  • Life and disability insurance

  • Medical malpractice insurance

  • Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS)

  • Basic Life Support (BLS)

  • Neonatal Resuscitation Program (NRP)

  • Pediatric Advanced Life Support (PALS)

  • $900 CME conference stipend annually; increases to $1,900 CME conference stipend in final year of primary residency training

  • $2,400 meal stipend*

  • $3,000 housing stipend*

  • $1,000 travel stipend*

  • Free parking

  • Lab coats

*Included in salary

In addition, Emergency Medicine residents also receive:

  • Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS)

  • American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP) membership

  • American College of Osteopathic Emergency Physicians (ACOEP) membership

  • Days off each year to attend an EM national conference

  • Online review courses

PGY 1

Emergency Medicine, Good Samaritan Hospital

26 weeks

Medical Intensive Care Unit

4 weeks

OB/GYN

4 weeks

Toxicology

4 weeks

Vacation

4 weeks

Anesthesia

2 weeks

Ophthalmology

2 weeks

Orthopedics

2 weeks

Emergency Ultrasound

2 weeks

Emergency Medical Services

2 weeks

 

PGY 2

Emergency Medicine, Good Samaritan Hospital

26 weeks

Emergency Medicine, Level I Trauma Center, Queens, NY

4 weeks

Pediatric Emergency Medicine

4 weeks

Emergency Medicine Administration

2 weeks

Surgical Intensive Care Unit

4 weeks

Shock Trauma Center, Baltimore, MD

4 weeks

Pediatric Intensive Care Unit

4 weeks

Vacation

4 weeks

 

PGY 3                                                                                             

Emergency Medicine, Good Samaritan Hospital

28 weeks

Pediatric Emergency Medicine

8 weeks

Neuro Intensive Care Unit

2 weeks

Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

2 weeks

Observational Medicine (CDU)

4 weeks

Elective

4 weeks

Vacation

4 weeks

 

Affiliated Sites

To ensure a diverse and well-rounded experience, the program has affiliations with:

  • FDNY EMS
  • Level 1 urban emergency medicine facility
  • NYC Poison Control Center
  • The R Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center in Baltimore, Maryland

 

  • Burn Medicine
  • Cardiology
  • Coronary Care Unit (CCU)
  • Dermatology
  • Emergency Medicine Clinical Decision Unit
  • Emergency Medicine Critical Care
  • Emergency Medical Services (EMS)
  • General Surgery
  • Hand Surgery
  • Infectious Disease
  • Internal Medicine
  • International Medicine
  • Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU)
  • Neurology
  • Neurosurgery
  • Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery (OMFS)
  • Pediatric Anesthesia
  • Plastic Surgery
  • Psychiatry
  • Rural Medicine
  • Urology
  • Cadaver Lab
  • EM lecture conference series, weekly
  • Grand rounds
  • Journal club
  • Morning case conference presentations
  • Morning teaching/sign-out rounds
  • Procedure lab
  • Simulation lab
  • Structured reading program
  • Radiology and EKG take-home quizzes, biweekly
  • Trauma conference
  • Ultrasound training
  • Wellness retreat

As an Emergency Medicine resident, you will complete, publish and present a clinical case report based on an interesting or rare case worth. You will also conduct an independent research project. The goals of these requirements are to advance knowledge of the basic principles of scientific inquiry, including research design, project implementation, statistical analysis, and application to patient care.

You will conduct the research project in close contact with a faculty mentor in an area of your choice. Each case report and research project is published in a professional academic journal and presented at national or regional conferences. Our Emergency Medicine residents often place in presentation competitions at national conferences. Residents gain pride in their work, honor for our program and hospital, and often receive gift cards.

Research activities are supplemented by journal club sessions, which are often hosted at a faculty member or resident’s home. You learn to critically evaluate published studies, apply new knowledge and techniques to clinical practice, and communicate up-to-date information to a patient. We value and encourage evidence-based medicine, and we want to prepare you for lifelong learning.

Case Presentations and Posters

Influence of Emergency Department Daily Volume on Utilization of Computed Tomography Scans

Katherine Lang, DO, David Levy, DO, Victoria Levy

When EDs become busier during high volume days, it sometimes becomes difficult for providers to spend a significant amount of time at the bedside obtaining histories. We wish to see if providers change their imaging ordering practices on busier days, perhaps as a counter measure to evaluate for pathology when time at the bedside is limited.

The Incidence of Clinically Significant MRA Findings for TIA Patients in the CDU

Amanda Pacheco, DO, Robert Bramante MD, Victoria Levy

Our ED runs a Clinical Decision Unit/Observation Unit where patients with stroke-like symptoms can be dispositioned to while they wait for further MRI imaging to evaluate for cerebrovascular accidents. This study looks at how often these patients ultimately have abnormal MR findings when placed in this unit.

Small Bowel Obstruction in an Adolescent Male with No Apparent Risk Factors: A Rare Case of Superior Mesenteric Artery Syndrome

Brianna Thiessen, DO, Christine Hickey, DO, Reethamma Daniel MD

Superior mesenteric artery syndrome (SMAS) is an uncommon condition that can lead to upper gastrointestinal obstruction. While it is a rare diagnosis, it is important to consider SMAS in the differential diagnosis of a pediatric patient presenting with bilious emesis and no other risk factors for intestinal obstruction.

Correlation Between the Use of Warning Lights and Sirens and Vehicular Collisions during Emergency Medical Service Transport

Henry Marr, DO, David Levy, DO

This is a survey project to determine how often local EMS drivers have gotten into accidents when using warning lights and sirens.

Full Moon Mania: Busting the Myth of Surge in the Emergency Department Based on the Lunar Calendar

Callee Heywood, DO, Adam Schwartz, DO

The project looks into the myth that EDs become busier during full moons. It looks at a number of statistics, including psychiatric holds, volume and acuity.

A Complicated Case of Cerebral Venous Thrombosis

Amanda Pacheco, DO, MS, David Levy, DO, Robert Gekle, MD

Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is a rare finding, but one that must be considered in the differential diagnosis for patients presenting with a variety of chief complaints to the ED, especially those with complaints of headache and vague neurologic symptoms. There is often a delay in the diagnosis of CVT given the typically ambiguous presentation. CVT is easily misdiagnosed. Without considering it among the differential diagnoses, one might not order the diagnostic CT venography or MR venography, which is often required, as CT without contrast may be entirely normal. We present a case of a patient with multiple risk factors for CVT who presented to the ED several times over a 6-week period. He had a recent diagnosis of aseptic meningitis and was ultimately diagnosed with a transverse sinus thrombosis requiring immediate anticoagulation. This case exemplifies the need to keep CVT on the list of differential diagnoses, and if clinical suspicion is high enough, to order the appropriate advanced imaging.

Pyloric Stenosis in Monozygotic Twin Girls

Andrew Leubitz, DO, MBA, Reethamma Daniel, MD, FAAP

Childhood emesis is a common chief compliant in the ED with the pattern of projectile vomiting in infants being highly suggestive of infantile hypertrophic pyloric stenosis (IHPS). IHPS has an incidence of two to three per 1,000 babies in the general population, > 80% are males, 90% diagnosed between two- and seven-weeks old. Our case examines the diagnostic work-up of pyloric stenosis, in the rare presentation in the setting of monozygotic twin girls, diagnosed concurrently in the ED and confirmed in the operating room.

Prevertebral Hematoma Secondary to Cervical Spine Fracture in a Geriatric Patient with Dysphagia Following a Fall from Standing Height

Katherine Lang, DO, Kathleen Sullivan, DO, Wojciech Bober, DO

Cervical spine injuries occur in approximately 3.7% of all trauma patients. As such, it is important to consider cervical spine fracture, even in patients with seemingly minor injuries, especially if they have certain risk factors, such as advanced age or ankylosing spondylitis. Prevertebral hematoma, though rare, is a serious potential complication of cervical spine fractures. This particular case emphasizes the importance of maintaining a low threshold for cervical spine imaging in the elderly despite risk stratification tools.

Upper Cervical Epidural Abscess Resulting in Respiratory Compromise After Lumbar Steroid Injection

Jordan LaFave, DO, Robert Bramante, MD

We discuss a case in which a 45-year-old male patient developed an upper cervical epidural abscess 48 hours after receiving a lumbar steroid injection. The patient presented with diminished strength in all four extremities and respiratory distress secondary to the space-occupying lesion near his spinal cord. He was eventually discharged to rehabilitation, but never regained full strength in his arms or legs.

Safe Smoking?: A Case of Blast Injury from an Exploding Electronic Cigarette

Brady Pennig, DO, Steven Zimmerman, MD, Adam Schwartz, DO, Steve Sattler, DO

Emergency medicine physicians must remain up to date and aware of all new public health risks. Electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) have recently been proposed as long-term substitutes for smoking or as an ultimate means to cessation. The safety of e-cigarettes has recently been questioned. We describe a 58-year-old male who presented to our community ED with severe facial injuries following an e-cigarette explosion.

A Case of Delayed Cardiac Tamponade After Elective Cardiac Stenting

Henry Marr, DO, David Levy, DO

A 57-year-old male presented to the ED with complaints of multiple episodes of syncope occurring over the last two days when he had undergone elective cardiac catheterization with placement of two cardiac stents. His initial ED ECG showed complete heart block and bedside sonography showed a small pericardial effusion without evidence of other abnormality. He was sent to the catheterization lab for evaluation of stent patency and then with evidence of cardiac tamponade from coronary rupture, he was subsequently taken to the operating room where a pericardial window was performed.

Exposure to Observation Medicine in United States Emergency Medicine Residency Training Programs

Patrick Cary, DO, Robert Bramante, MD, David Levy, DO, Robert Gekle, MD

The goal of our study was to evaluate the prevalence of observation medicine (OM) education in EM residencies. The survey was distributed in 2017 to program directors and core faculty in EM residency programs throughout the United States. Our study found that 46.7% of respondents exposed their residents to a dedicated OU. Our results were compared to a survey performed by Mace et al. in November 1999 to January 2000 and did not appear to show a significant increase in didactics or clinical rotations in OM over the past 16 years despite a growth in OM units.

A Randomized, Prospective Comparison of Food Versus Non-food Based Gelatin Homemade Ultrasound Phantoms

Clarice Zhang, DO, Robert Bramante, MD, Robert Gekle, MD, David Levy, DO

Point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) has become readily available as a bedside resource and has been proven to be beneficial to patients. There is a need for affordable homemade ultrasound phantoms that reproduce the texture and resistance of human tissue, have sufficient ultrasound penetration to enable the identification and location of targets, have a long shelf life, and have no infection control issues. Our study supports our hypothesis that the non-food-based model outlasted the food-based models when evaluating Knox gelatin, agar gelatin, and ballistic gelatin. The Knox gelatin model was the preferred model for imaging but had a shelf-life of only 15 days.

Perception of EMS Towards the Use of Warning Lights and Sirens

Michael J. Slisz, DO, Steven Sattler, DO

National data demonstrates the use of warning lights and sirens by EMS providers for non-emergent patient transports increases the risks of motor vehicle collisions (MVCs), and usually decreases patient transports by less than two minutes. This study seeks to determine the extent of local EMS provider knowledge regarding the information/risks of using warning lights and sirens, and the amount local providers have been using warning lights and sirens for patient transports compared with number of MVCs they were involved in.

Comparing Return Rates Between Patients Treated in the Observation Unit with IV Antibiotic Therapy Versus Patients Discharged from the ED with Oral Antibiotic Therapy

Joanna Marino, DO, Robert Bramante MD, Radhika Malhotra, MD

Cellulitis is a common complaint in the ED with no definitive guidelines to direct outpatient versus inpatient treatment. Observation units (OU) are emerging as a bridge between treat and release patients, and inpatient hospital admission. A brief stay in the observation unit to provide IV antibiotics can decrease recidivism rates to the ED for patients diagnosed with cellulitis.

Bilateral Carotid Artery Dissection Masquerading as Strep Pharyngitis

Adam Schwartz, DO, Joanna Marino, DO, Christine Hall, DO

Carotid artery dissection (CAD) is a relatively rare cause of ischemic stroke. Spontaneous bilateral CAD is a rare and poorly understood process associated with a poor prognosis. The most commonly reported symptoms on presentation of CAD include headache, neck pain, and neurologic deficits. These vague symptoms can make diagnosis difficult.

Good Samaritan Hospital offers fourth-year medical student electives in EM, which are available year round. The number of students doing an elective is limited to avoid diluting the educational experience of all rotators. Through the EM elective, you become an integral part of the rotation and part of the ED team. Our emergency medicine faculty and residents are energetic and highly motivated to promote EM and ensure an educational and rewarding rotation.

You are responsible for the complete care and management of their assigned patients from initial work-up through disposition. There are many opportunities to practice basic procedures, as well as possibly performing more invasive or emergent procedures. You work under the supervision of the ED attending and a senior resident when assigned to the same team.

To arrange an EM elective, contact the Department of Medical Education at Good Samaritan Hospital at 631-376-4163 or Alison.Kucera@chsli.org.

Scheduling

During a typical four-week rotation, you will have fourteen 12-hour shifts (7 a.m.–7 p.m., 7 p.m.–7 a.m. or 11 a.m.–11:00 p.m.). We make every effort to honor special scheduling requests that are within the guidelines of the schedule.

Academics

  • Core reading material — Topics reflect the fundamentals of emergency medicine. During the final week of the rotation, you sit for an exit exam and evaluation.
  • Morning conference — During shifts on Mondays, Thursdays and Fridays, rotators attend case presentation conferences and have an opportunity to present one case during their rotation.
  • Specialty workshops — Every Tuesday, we present a hands-on session to teach students the fundamental skills in the areas of suturing, splinting and EKG and radiography/ultrasound.
  • Walking/Sign-out rounds — Formal bedside rounds are made at shift changes (7 a.m. and 7 p.m.). This allows the ED attending and residents to hand off patients to the next team. You will actively participate when learning points related to the patient caseload are discussed.
  • Wednesday educational conference — You are required to attend and participate.

Evaluation

Students are graded based on shift evaluations, feedback on morning report presentations, EKG and radiology quizzes, and an exit exam. In addition to our evaluation of the student's performance on their rotation, students have the opportunity to evaluate their rotation experience. Students who would like a standardized letter of evaluation (SLOE) should request it before the end of their rotation.

Other Available Rotations

Good Samaritan Hospital is also a major affiliate and teaching campus for the New York Institute of Technology — College of Osteopathic Medicine (NYIT-COM) and Mount Sinai School of Medicine. We offer third and fourth-year medical student rotations in multiple specialties, including OB/GYN, Surgery, Family Medicine and Pediatrics.

Frequently Asked Questions

Yes, we accept graduates from MD and DO medical schools. The program has ACGME accreditation. The program received initial accreditation the first time it applied. We are in the initial accreditation phase. The program started in 2004 as a DO-only program and is in good standing with the American Osteopathic Association (AOA), the accrediting body. We included all ACGME requirements in anticipation that the two accrediting bodies would merge or change. With the movement to have all prior DO-only programs become ACGME accredited, we now accept both MD and DO medical schools graduates.

Yes, the EM program always sets aside time for the candidates to informally meet and interact with current residents without faculty. This usually occurs on interview day. There are some questions best answered by residents. Be wary of a program that does not provide this opportunity. It may mean that residents are discouraged from speaking freely for concern about what they may say.

Senior EM residents have the role of Trauma Team Captain, while junior EM residents perform the technical procedures. The ED does not have surgery or anesthesiology residencies, so there is no “turf war” for trauma cases. Emergency physicians must be ready for whatever comes through the doors, so we prepare our residents to be able to perform advanced invasive procedures, as well as basic stabilization and team leadership. Very little is out of the scope of practice for our residents.

The ED team is responsible for all medical resuscitations. Senior EM residents have the role of directing the resuscitation (with an attending present), while junior EM residents perform technical procedures. We encourage junior residents to become proficient at procedures as soon as possible. As our senior residents gain comfort with their technical skills, they transition to a leadership role during resuscitations and coordinate care for complex medical cases. This process results in competent young physicians capable of managing critically ill and unstable patients.

The Pediatric ED at Good Samaritan Hospital sees one of the highest volumes of children in New York. We place a strong emphasis on pediatric clinical education. We know that adequate exposure to pediatric EM is essential. Rotations of acceptable quality and frequency ideally in a dedicated pediatric ED is the optimum route to this exposure.

In EM, ultrasound is a modality that has become indispensable and, in many cases, the standard of care. It is included on EM board exams and is a required part of EM education.

Most of our ED is credentialed for point-of-care ultrasound with a direct link to store and interpret studies in our PACS system. We perform many studies that are not done by radiology, such as the FAST, RUSH, focused echocardiography, head and neck, airway, lung, and procedural guidance. For studies that are also performed by radiology, we have 24/7 radiology-performed ultrasound for cases where we may not be able to obtain adequate images. We provide regular lectures and practical sessions, in addition to the routine clinical applications in conjunction with our fellowship in Emergency Ultrasound.

Yes, the more experience and skill residents obtain, the more proficient they become at independently assessing and rendering treatment. Graduated responsibility over the course of a residency program is required to produce competent self-sufficient emergency physicians. A program should have clearly defined goals, as well as a defined method of ensuring residents meet those milestones to continue advancing.

Yes, Good Samaritan Hospital has a fully accredited Department of Emergency Medicine with representation on the hospital’s medical board.

It is important to note that some institutions do not have a Department of Emergency Medicine. In these instances, the ED operates under another specialty, such as the Department of Surgery or Department of Medicine. This could result in critical administrative decisions being made by people other than emergency physicians. Resources may be scarce and shared with other programs/departments.

We have a very collegial relationship with the other services. Most services do not have residents, so the specialist attending physicians directly care for patients. This gives residents ample face time with our specialists who go over important teaching points from interesting cases. We have multiple guest lecturers from other specialties contributing to the enhancement of resident conference as well.

Through the Department of Graduate Medical Education, our program participates in monthly collaboration and sharing of information and resources. The department’s administration has full representation on the hospital’s medical board and have equal footing with all other departments.

The ED has the final say. There is no fight or debate about it. We do not have a MAR or admitting hospitalist that can block an admission. This is an important question to ask because not every ED facility is set up this way.

Your co-residents and interns become a very significant part of your life. We do not have a sense of competition or conflict between our residents. Instead, we offer a supportive environment that is conducive to education. Residency involves a large commitment of time and hard work. You need to be surrounded by people who interact well and are supportive of each other. You can get a feel for this during the day of your interview. Doing a rotation in the hospital you are considering is often the best way to get a feel for a program.

One of the built-in features of our program is to foster positive relationships between our residents and attendings. These interactions include one-to-one mentor meetings, social events and informal opportunities.

When considering a program, ask yourself: Do residents and attendings get along? Do they have a good time together? Do they dislike each other? Am I going to enjoy working with these people for four years?

Our chief residents make the schedule, which is then reviewed by an attending, to ensure it is fair and reasonable. Our patient load is sufficient for you to develop procedural and clinical proficiency as an emergency physician. We have a comprehensive patient mix with a reasonable workload and many interesting clinical cases, while allowing time for academics and other interests.

Residency is a full-time job and then some. No matter what field or institution you choose, you are going to spend a lot of time away from home. In our program, we regularly organize special events for residents, their immediate families and significant others. It gives a chance for the most important people in our lives to be included in our residency family. We also foster relationships through regular individual resident meetings with a faculty mentor and Big Brother/Big Sister program as well as general residency meetings to address issues.

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Meet Our Faculty

Christopher C. Raio, MD, MBA, FACEP, FAIUM

Chairman, Department of Emergency Medicine

Medical School: Howard University College of Medicine, Washington, D.C.
Residency Training Specialty/Location: Emergency Medicine/North Shore University Hospital
Fellowship Training Specialty/Location: Emergency Ultrasound/North Shore University Hospital

Board Certification:

  • Emergency Medicine (ABEM)

Hobby/Interest: Traveling and an avid sports fan.

Eric Decena, MD, FACEP

Vice Chairman, Department of Emergency Medicine

Medical School: St. George's University, Grenada, West Indies
Residency Training Specialty/Location: Emergency Medicine/SUNY Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY

Board Certification:

  • Emergency Medicine (ABEM)

Hobby/Interest: Scuba diving with wild dolphins

Reethamma Daniel, MD, FAAP

Director, Pediatric Emergency Medicine

Medical School: Medical College, Calicut, India
Residency Training Specialty/Location: Pediatrics/St. Luke's Roosevelt, New York, NY
Fellowship Training/Location: Pediatric Emergency Medicine/St. Luke's Roosevelt, New York, NY

Board Certification:

  • Emergency Medicine (ABPEM)
  • Pediatrics (ABP)

Hobby/Interest: Cooking

David Levy, DO, FACEP, FACOEP

Program Director, Emergency Medicine Residency

Medical School: New York Institute of Technology, College of Osteopathic Medicine, Old Westbury, NY
Residency Training Specialty/Location: Emergency Medicine/Long Island Jewish Medical Center, New Hyde Park, NY

Board Certifications:

  • Emergency Medicine (ABEM, AOBE)

Hobbies: Engineering and construction

Robert Gekle, MD, FACEP

Associate Program Director, Emergency Medicine Residency
Associate Program Director, Emergency Ultrasound

Medical School: New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY
Residency Training Specialty/Location: Emergency Medicine/North Shore University Hospital, Manhasset, NY
Fellowship Training/Location: Emergency Ultrasound/North Shore University Hospital, Manhasset, NY

Board Certification:

  • Emergency Medicine (ABEM)

Hobby/Interest: Being with my kids, surfing, sailing, snowboarding

Justin Bennett, DO

Medical School: Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine
Residency Training Specialty/Location: Emergency & Family Practice / St. Barnabas Hospital, Bronx NY

Board Certification:

  • Emergency Medicine (AOBEM)

Hobby/Interest: Skiing in the winter and sailing in the summer.

Robert Bramante, MD, RDMS, FACEP

Core Faculty, Emergency Medicine Residency
Chairman of Emergency Medicine at Mercy Medical Center

Medical School: Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA
Residency Training Specialty/Location: Emergency Medicine/North Shore University Hospital, Manhasset, NY
Fellowship Training Specialty/Location: Emergency Ultrasonography, North Shore-Long Island Jewish Health System, Manhasset, NY

Board Certifications:

  • Emergency Medicine (ABEM)

Hobbies: Woodworking, swimming, and spending time with my family

Howard Brown, MD

Medical School: New York Institute of Technology, College of Osteopathic Medicine, Old Westbury, NY
Residency Training Specialty/Location: Emergency Medicine/St. Barnabas Hospital, Bronx, NY
Board Certifications:

  • Emergency Medicine (ABEM)

Hobby/Interest: I am an avid golfer and boater/fisher

Katrina D'Amore, DO, MPH

Medical School: New York Institute of Technology, College of Osteopathic Medicine, Old Westbury, NY
Residency Training Specialty/Location: Emergency Medicine/St. Joseph’s University Medical Center, Paterson NJ
Fellowship Training Specialty/Location: Medical Education/St. Joseph’s University Medical Center, Paterson NJ

Board Certifications:

  • Board Eligible Emergency Medicine (ABEM)

Hobby/Interest: Spending the summer at the beach with family, cooking, raising chickens, aspiring homesteader

Michael Felicetta, DO

Fellowship Director, Emergency Ultrasound

Medical School: New York Institute of Technology, College of Osteopathic Medicine, Old Westbury, NY
Residency Training Specialty/Location: Emergency Medicine/New York Methodist Hospital, Brooklyn, NY
Fellowship Training Specialty/Location: Emergency Ultrasonography: Emergency Ultrasound/NY Methodist Hospital, Brooklyn, NY

Board Certifications:

  • Emergency Medicine (ABEM)

Hobby/Interest: Traveling and family time with my kids

Christine Hickey, DO

Core Faculty, Emergency Medicine Residency

Medical School: New York Institute of Technology, College of Osteopathic Medicine, Old Westbury, NY
Residency Training Specialty/Location: Emergency Medicine/Good Samaritan Hospital Medical Center, West Islip, NY

Board Certifications:

  • Board Eligible Emergency Medicine (ABEM)

Hobby/Interest:

Heather Hughes, DO

Medical School: New York Institute of Technology, College of Osteopathic Medicine, Old Westbury, NY
Residency Training Specialty/Location: Emergency Medicine/Good Samaritan Hospital Medical Center, West Islip, NY

Board Certification:

  • Emergency Medicine (AOBEM)

Hobby/Interest: Traveling and spending time with family

Lauren Klein, MD

Medical School: University of Colorado School of Medicine
Residency Training Specialty/Location: Emergency Medicine/Hennepin County Medical Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota
Fellowship Training Specialty/Location: Research/Hennepin County Medical Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota

Board Certifications:

  • American Board of Emergency Medicine (ABEM)

Hobby/Interest:

David Lee, MD

Medical School: Boston University, Boston, MA
Residency Training Specialty/Location: Emergency Medicine/Medical College of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA
Fellowship Training Specialty/Location: Medical Toxicology/Medical College of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA

Board Certifications:

  • Emergency Medicine/Toxicology

Hobby/Interest: Endless Adventures

Veena Modayil, MD

Medical School: New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY
Residency Training Specialty/Location: Emergency Medicine/North Shore University Hospital, Manhasset, NY
Fellowship Training Specialty/Location: Emergency Ultrasonography, North Shore University Hospital, Manhasset, NY

Board Certifications:

  • Emergency Medicine (ABEM)

Hobby/Interest: Retail therapy

 

Alice Nadel, DO

Medical School: Nova Southeastern University College of Osteopathic Medicine
Residency Training Specialty/Location: Emergency Medicine/Mount Sinai School of Medicine, Manhattan, NY; General Practice/Wellington Regional Medical Medical Center, Wellington, FL; Transitional Internship/Wellington Regional Medical Medical Center, Wellington, FL

Board Certification:

  • Emergency Medicine (ABEM)

Hobby/Interest: Kayaking, water skiing, paddle boarding

Steven Sattler, DO

Core Faculty, Emergency Medicine Residency
Associate Research Director, Emergency Medicine Residency

Medical School: New York Institute of Technology, College of Osteopathic Medicine, Old Westbury, NY
Residency Training Specialty/Location: Emergency Medicine – Internal Medicine/St. Barnabas Hospital, Bronx, NY

Board Certification:

  • Emergency Medicine (AOBEM)
  • Internal Medicine (AOBIM)

Interesting Fact: Often gets confused for a priest

Adam Schwartz, DO

Associate Research Director, Emergency Medicine Residency

Medical School: New York Institute of Technology, College of Osteopathic Medicine, Old Westbury, NY
Residency Training Specialty/Location: Emergency Medicine/Good Samaritan Hospital Medical Center, West Islip, NY

Board Certifications:

  • Emergency Medicine (AOBEM)

Hobby/Interest:

Sanjay Shetty, MD, MBA, FACEP

Medical School: New York University, New York, NY
Residency Training Specialty/Location: Emergency Medicine/Kings County Hospital Center/Downstate, Brooklyn, NY

Board Certifications:

  • Emergency Medicine (ABEM)

Hobby/Interest: Introspection

Joseph Zito, MD

Medical School: Ross University school of Medicine
Residency Training Specialty/Location: Emergency Medicine/Stony Brook University, Stony Brook NY
Fellowship Training Specialty/Location: Critical Care/Northwell Manhasset, Manhasset NY

Board Certifications:

  • Emergency Medicine (ABEM)
  • Critical care and Neuro Critical care

Hobby/Interest:

Rudolph Baldeo, MD

Medical School: Ross University School of Medicine, Dominica, West Indies
Residency Training Specialty/Location: Pediatrics/Winthrop University Hospital, Mineola, NY

Board Certification:

  • Pediatrics (ABP)

Interesting Fact: Has visited 124 countries

Halina Borowski, MD, FAAP

Medical School: Medical Academy, Bialystok, Poland
Residency Training Specialty/Location: Pediatrics/Cohen Children’s Medical Center (formerly known as Schneider Children’s Hospital) - Long Island Jewish Medical Center, New Hyde Park, NY
Fellowship Training/Location: Pediatric Emergency Medicine/Cohen Children’s Medical Center (formerly known as Schneider Children’s Hospital) - Long Island Jewish Medical Center, New Hyde Park, NY

Board Certification:

  • Emergency Medicine (ABPEM)
  • Pediatrics (ABP)

Hobby/Interest: Architecture & home design

Isaac Gordon, MD

Medical School: Sophie Davis School of Biomedical Education/New York Medical College, New York NY
Residency Training Specialty/Location: Pediatrics Westchester Medical Center/New York Medical College, Westchester County NY
Fellowship Training Specialty/Location: Pediatrics Emergency Medicine / SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn NY
Board Certifications:

  • General Pediatrics
  • Board Eligible Pediatrics Emergency Medicine

Hobby/Interest: Cooking, Hiking, Outdoor sports, and Archery.

Paul Lee, MD

Medical School: New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY
Residency Training Specialty/Location: Pediatrics/ NY Presbyterian Hospital Weill-Cornell Medical Center, New York, NY
Fellowship Training Specialty/Location: Infectious Disease

Board Certifications:

  • Pediatrics Infectious Disease

Hobby/Interest: Global medicine, adoption medicine, and foster/kinship care

Delia Rogu, MD, FAAP

Medical School: University of Medicine, Bucharest, Romania
Residency Training Specialty/Location: Pediatrics/Flushing Hospital, Flushing, NY

Board Certification:

  • Pediatrics (ABP)

Hobby/Interest: Skiing and tennis

Mamatha Sundaresh, MD

Medical School: Bangalore Medical School, Bangalore, India
Residency Training Specialty/Location: Pediatrics/Bangalore University, Bangalore, India
Hobby/Interest: Reading mystery books, traveling, music and dance

Masood Yeroushalmi, MD

Medical School: St. George's University, Grenada, West Indies
Residency Training Specialty/Location:Pediatrics/Flushing Hospital, Flushing, NY
Board Certifications:

  • Pediatrics
  • Emergency Medicine

Hobby/Interest: Traveling, swimming and sports

David Levy, DO, FACEP, FACOEP

Program Director, Emergency Medicine Residency

Medical School: New York Institute of Technology, College of Osteopathic Medicine, Old Westbury, NY
Residency Training Specialty/Location: Emergency Medicine/Long Island Jewish Medical Center, New Hyde Park, NY

Board Certifications:

  • Emergency Medicine (ABEM, AOBE)

Hobbies: Engineering and construction

Robert L. Gekle, MD, FACEP

Associate Program Director, Emergency Medicine Residency
Associate Director, Emergency Ultrasound

Medical School: New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY
Residency Training Specialty/Location: North Shore University Hospital, Manhasset, NY
Fellowship Training Specialty/Location: Emergency Ultrasound, North Shore University Hospital, Manhasset, NY

Board Certifications:

  • Emergency Medicine (ABEM)

Hobbies: Being with my kids, surfing, sailing, snowboarding

Christopher C. Raio, MD, MBA, FACEP, FAIUM

Chairman, Department of Emergency Medicine

Medical School: Howard University College of Medicine, Washington, D.C.
Residency Training Specialty/Location: Emergency Medicine/North Shore University Hospital
Fellowship Training Specialty/Location: Emergency Ultrasound/North Shore University Hospital

Board Certification:

  • Emergency Medicine (ABEM)

Hobby/Interest: Traveling and an avid sports fan.

Reethamma Daniel, MD, FAAP

Director, Pediatric Emergency Medicine

Medical School: Medical College, Calicut, India
Residency Training Specialty/Location: Pediatrics/St. Luke's Roosevelt, New York, NY
Fellowship Training/Location: Pediatric Emergency Medicine/St. Luke's Roosevelt, New York, NY

Board Certification:

  • Emergency Medicine (ABPEM)
  • Pediatrics (ABP)

Hobby/Interest: Cooking

Eric Decena, MD, FACEP

Vice Chairman, Department of Emergency Medicine

Medical School: St. George's University, Grenada, West Indies
Residency Training Specialty/Location: Emergency Medicine/SUNY Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY

Board Certification:

  • Emergency Medicine (ABEM)

Hobby/Interest: Scuba diving with wild dolphins

Steven Sattler, DO

Core Faculty, Emergency Medicine Residency
Associate Research Director, Emergency Medicine Residency
Co-Director, Observation Services

Medical School: New York Institute of Technology, College of Osteopathic Medicine, Old Westbury, NY
Residency Training Specialty/Location: Emergency Medicine - Internal Medicine/St. Barnabas Hospital, Bronx, NY

Board Certifications:

  • Emergency Medicine (AOBEM)
  • Internal Medicine (AOBIM)

Interesting Fact: Often gets confused for a priest

Michael Felicetta, DO

Fellowship Director, Emergency Ultrasound

Medical School: New York Institute of Technology, College of Osteopathic Medicine, Old Westbury, NY
Residency Training Specialty/Location: Emergency Medicine/New York Methodist Hospital, Brooklyn, NY
Fellowship Training Specialty/Location: Emergency Ultrasonography: Emergency Ultrasound/NY Methodist Hospital, Brooklyn, NY

Board Certifications:

  • Emergency Medicine (ABEM)

Hobbies: Traveling and family time with my kids

Adam Schwartz, DO

Research Director, Emergency Medicine Residency

Medical School: New York Institute of Technology, College of Osteopathic Medicine, Old Westbury, NY
Residency Training Specialty/Location: Emergency Medicine/Good Samaritan Hospital Medical Center, West Islip, NY

Board Certifications:

  • Emergency Medicine (AOBEM)

Christine Hickey, DO

Core Faculty, Emergency Medicine Residency

Medical School: New York Institute of Technology, College of Osteopathic Medicine, Old Westbury, NY
Residency Training Specialty/Location: Emergency Medicine/Good Samaritan Hospital Medical Center, West Islip, NY

Board Certifications:

  • Board Eligible Emergency Medicine (ABEM)

Robert Bramante, MD, RDMS, FACEP

Core Faculty, Emergency Medicine Residency
Chairman of Emergency Medicine at Mercy Medical Center

Medical School: Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA
Residency Training Specialty/Location: Emergency Medicine/North Shore University Hospital, Manhasset, NY
Fellowship Training Specialty/Location: Emergency Ultrasonography, North Shore-Long Island Jewish Health System, Manhasset, NY

Board Certifications:

  • Emergency Medicine (ABEM)

Hobbies: Woodworking, swimming, and spending time with my family

Justin Bennett, DO

Medical School: Touro college of Osteopathic Medicine
Residency Training Specialty/Location: Emergency & Family Practice / St. Barnabas Hospital, Bronx NY

Board Certification:

  • Emergency Medicine (AOBEM)

Hobby/Interest: Skiing in the winter and sailing in the summer.

Meet Our Current Residents

Andrew Leubitz, DO

Undergraduate: Ohio State University
Medical School: Ohio University Heritage College of Osteopathic Medicine
Hometown: Akron, OH
Hobbies: Biking, travel, movies, cooking, long walks on the beach (got to love the classics)
Fun fact: I am part of one of eight sets of twins in my family

Teagan Lukacs, DO

Undergraduate:Boston University
Medical School: A.T. Still University of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona
Hometown: Sodus Point, NY
Hobbies/Interest: Alpine Ski racing, rugby and surfing
Fun Fact: I learned how to surf in Cape Town, South Africa and didn’t see one shark.

Stephen Petrou, MD

Undergraduate: University of Western Ontario
Medical School: St. George's University School of Medicine
Hometown: Toronto ON, Canada
Hobbies/Interest: Cooking, surfing, photography and traveling
Fun Fact: I've spent Christmas morning free diving with lemon sharks off the South Pacific Islands of Tahiti.

Max Piazza, DO

Undergraduate: U.S. Air Force Academy
Medical School: A.T. Still University Kirksville College of Osteopathic Medicine
Hometown: St. Louis, MO
Hobbies/Interest: Hiking, climbing, underwater basket weaving, reading
Fun Fact: I caught a six foot long electric eel in the jungle.

Michael Simon, DO

Undergraduate: Florida State University
Medical School: Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine
Hometown: Archer, FL
Hobbies: Fishing, running, swimming
Fun/interesting fact: I spent ten days collecting insects in Suriname for the Florida Museum of Natural History.

Nicole Vigh, DO

Undergraduate: Hofstra University
Medical School: New York Institute of Technology
Hometown: Holtsville, NY
Hobbies/Interest: CrossFit, Running, and getting my nails done
Fun Fact: I’m a second degree black belt!

Anil Bhagavath, MD

Undergraduate: Tufts University
Medical School: St. George's University School of Medicine
Hometown: Huntington Station, NY
Hobbies/Interest: NY Islanders, Yankees, Giants and scuba diving
Fun Fact: I met my wife in Grenada, got married in Cancun and honeymooned in Punta Cana.

Israel Castillo, DO

Undergraduate: Ave Maria University
Medical School: William Carey University College of Osteopathic Medicine
Hometown: Hattiesburg, MS
Hobbies/Interest: swimming, traveling, cooking and Medical Mission trips.
Fun Fact: I'm a baritone singer and love acting in plays.

Stephen Elliott, DO

Undergraduate:New York Institute of Technology (NYIT)
Medical School: New York Institute of Technology College of Osteopathic Medicine
Hometown: Merrick, NY
Hobbies/Interest: sports, cooking, fantasy books & movies.
Fun Fact: If I wasn’t in medicine, I would have been a golf instructor or chef!

Christopher Jones, MD

Undergraduate: Rutgers University
Medical School: St. George’s University School of Medicine
Hometown: Bloomfield, NJ
Hobbies/Interest: The Great Outdoors...Triathlon, cycling, running, hiking, camping, snowboarding, cooking, guitar.
Fun Fact: I’ve ridden my bike over 10,000 miles!

Leyla Kerimova, DO

Undergraduate: Brooklyn College
Medical School: New York Institute of Technology College of Osteopathic Medicine
Hometown: Brooklyn, New York
Hobbies/Interest: I love watching movies (especially oldies), going to the gym and taking road trips.
Fun Fact: I have a 4lb Teacup Yorkie and a 90lb Pitbull; they’re best friends!

Santiago Lopez, MD

Undergraduate: Iowa State University, Ames IA
Medical School: Universidad Autónoma de Guadalajara, Mexico
Hometown: Skokie, IL
Hobbies/Interest: running, going to the gym, watching sports with my buddies, trying new food and being outdoors.
Fun Fact: While living in Mexico, I played a soccer league championship final in a professional soccer stadium!

Zachary McCabe, MD

Undergraduate: Saint Anselm College
Medical School: St. George's University School of Medicine
Hometown: East Freetown, MA
Hobbies/Interest: weight lifting, running, boating, golfing, traveling, reading, exploring new restaurants and bars with friends and family.
Fun Fact: I grew up farming cranberries on cranberry bogs. Yes! It is just like the commercials.
 

Casey Neville, DO, MS

Undergraduate: Florida International University
Medical School: University of New England College of Osteopathic Medicine
Hometown: Miami, FL
Hobbies: exercising, cooking ethnic foods, music and singing.
Fun fact: I was in the best acapella group in my medical school... it was the only acapella group.

Anna Trtchounian, MD

Undergraduate: University of California, Riverside
Medical School: St. George's University
Hometown: La Crescenta, CA
Hobbies/Interest: Baking, dancing and solving puzzles
Fun Fact: I have lived in 4 countries and 5 states, so far.

Paxton Aung, DO

Undergraduate: Stony Brook University
Medical School: Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine - Harlem
Hometown: Queens, New York
Hobbies/Interest: Drawing / Sketching, music and playing video games.
Fun Fact: I have over 10,000 hours logged on a video game called DotA 2.

Philip Giarrusso, DO

Undergraduate:Fordham University
Medical School: Liberty University College of Osteopathic Medicine
Hometown: Fort Salonga, New York
Hobbies/Interest: Cooking new foods, Playing basketball, Skiing, watching the NY rangers and NY Mets, Traveling, Movies / TV shows, Going to the gym.
Fun Fact: I was born at Good Samaritan Hospital.

Samuel Hoffman, DO

Undergraduate: University of Michigan
Medical School: New York Institute of Technology College of Osteopathic Medicine
Hometown: Oceanside, New York
Hobbies/Interest: Going to the gym, Anything Sports related, Music, Netflix, Being an uncle.
Fun Fact: I once jumped off a 40 ft. cliff in Jamaica.

Adam Mei, DO

Undergraduate: Binghamton University
Medical School: Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine - Middletown
Hometown: Brooklyn, New York
Hobbies/Interest: Tennis, Weight-Lifting, Video games, Poker, Cooking, Traveling the world and trying new cuisines.
Fun Fact: I have received diplomas in Piano and Music Theory.

Christina Rustscheff, MD

Undergraduate: Queens University of Charlotte
Medical School: St. George's University School of Medicine
Hometown: Toronto, Canada
Hobbies/Interest: Tennis, Peloton, and Running.
Fun Fact: Played Tennis for Team Canada at the World University Games in Russia in 2013.

Shoshana Taube, MD

Undergraduate: Yeshiva University: Stern College for Women
Medical School: Technion American Medical School
Hometown: Sharon, MA
Hobbies/Interest: Krav Maga, Horseback riding, and Painting.
Fun Fact: I worked on a farm for a year before starting college.

Ryan Bacchus, MD

Undergraduate: The City College of New York
Medical School: Ross University School of Medicine
Hometown: Hollis, Queens NY
Hobbies/Interest: Sports, Baseball (Pitcher in college), Mets Fan, Religious studies, Cooking.
Fun Fact: I have a fraternal twin sister.

Cari Candas, MD

Undergraduate: Texas State University
Medical School: Ross University School of Medicine
Hometown: Dallas, TX
Hobbies/Interest: Sand volleyball, tennis, painting, and trying out new coffee shops.
Fun Fact:  I stumbled into a nest of boa constrictors on a jungle hike in Dominica.

Lauren Choban, DO

Undergraduate: Oberlin College
Medical School: Ohio University Heritage College of Osteopathic Medicine
Hometown: Westlake, OH
Hobbies/Interest: Yoga, Trying New Food, Baking and Traveling.
Fun Fact: I once swam in the same swim meet as Michael Phelps.

Bryan De La Torre, MD

Undergraduate: Rutgers University
Medical School: St. George's University
Hometown: Elmwood Park, NJ
Hobbies/Interest: Tennis, NFL (Packers!), NBA (Brooklyn!), traveling, food, video games.
Fun Fact: I never drink coffee!

Stavros Lalos, MD

Medical School: The Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland (RCSI)
Hometown: Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario Canada
Hobbies/Interest: Soccer, fishing, hiking, kayaking, cooking Greek food!
Fun Fact: Growing up in Canada I have become an expert in building backyard ice rinks in the winter.

Crystal Michaelides, DO

Undergraduate: Boston University
Medical School: New York Institute of Technology College of Osteopathic Medicine
Hometown: Mount Sinai, NY
Hobbies/Interest: Watching TV shows and movies, knitting, puzzles, being an aunt, spending time with friends/family, anything with my cat and puppy, reruns of Friends.
Fun Fact: I went skydiving after I graduated college!

Meet Our Graduates

Callee Heywood, DO

Chief Resident

Undergraduate: Union College
Medical School: Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine, Georgia
Hometown: Red Deer, Alberta, Canada
First job after residency: Good Samaritan Hospital, Ultrasound Fellowship, West Islip, NY

Katherine Lang, DO

Undergraduate: Philadelphia University
Medical School: Campbell University School of Osteopathic Medicine
Hometown: Hi-Nella, NJ
First job after residency: Good Samaritan Hospital, Ultrasound Fellowship, West Islip, NY

Amanda Pacheco, DO

Chief Resident

Undergraduate: Providence College, RI
Graduate School: Barry University, FL
Medical School: Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine
Hometown: Barrington, RI
First job after residency: Albert Einstein Medical Center, EMS Fellowship, Philadelphia, PA 

Brianna Thiessen, DO

Undergraduate: University of California, Davis
Medical School: Western University of Health Sciences
Hometown: Menifee, CA
First job after residency: Brookhaven Hospital, Patchogue, NY

Daniel Herzog, DO

Chief Resident

Undergraduate: Touro College, Harlem, NY
Medical School: Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine, NY
Hometown: Montreal, Canada
First job after residency: Winthrop University Hospital, Mineola, NY

Jordan LaFave, DO

Chief Resident

Undergraduate: University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI
Medical School: Michigan State University College of Osteopathic Medicine
Hometown: Bay City, MI
First job after residency: Spectrum Health Butterworth Hospital, Grand Rapids, MI

Nathan Nazzise, DO

Undergraduate: Brigham Young University, Provo, UT
Medical School: Midwestern University College of Osteopathic Medicine
Hometown: American Fork, UT
First job after residency: Kaiser Permanente San Jose Medical Center, San Jose, CA

Danielle Walsh, DO

Undergraduate: St. John’s University, Queens, NY
Medical School: Rocky Vista University College of Osteopathic Medicine
Hometown: Brooklyn, NY
First job after residency: Baystate Medical Center, Critical Case Medicine Fellowship, Springfield, MA